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A Great Loss

If you are middle aged or older you are witnessing the loss of the nation you knew and loved. The freedom to move about without having to be cautious or suspicious; trust in people, faith in our judicial system, a sound economy and the most powerful military in the world. My childhood and teen years were spent playing outside without concerns or fears and would be called home when the street lights came on.

Society has changed and continues to change and not necessarily for the better. Much of what this country fought for and sacrificed in WWII and the wars that followed is now being embraced by a radical element in government. As I at times reflect upon this change, I get mixed emotions. Several people I believe explained what I’m feeling as they are too, it’s called grief.

We think of grieving when someone dies. The truth is we grieve to some degree over every loss of many kinds. For example, the loss of abilities, health, financial security, loss of a job, sports event, death of a pet and the list goes on. What we do not grieve for at the time will resurface at a future loss. Some losses are small and recovery is very quick while others are not. Mourning is the expression of grief. Mourning is derived from the Latin verb that means “be anxious.” Mourning is a process of remembering and thinking about what was lost which can make people feel anxious and/or uncomfortable. At the same time, it has a good purpose. To go beyond our initial reaction so we can face our loss and learn to adapt to it. Secondly, what we experience in grief is normal and needs to be dealt with at some point. Allowing ourselves to grieve and do the work it requires develops our character and should draw us closer to God who can help us.

The loss of the USA as we knew it is deep and ongoing. It is important to acknowledge that grief and emotions associated with it so we can deal with them and not suppress them. An early experience of grief is denial. I sense many in America are in denial and that our country will one day soon get back to ‘normal.’ I like to be positive, but that is wishful thinking. We must grieve our loss and prepare for America on a collision course with Marxism. Yes, God is still in control and will see us through. Be sure to spend time in His word, prayer and worship.

Pr. Bob Snitzer                                      

By the Way:     

Sunday 6, 9:00 Morning worship & Holy Communion. Sermon:  Blessed is the Man Psalm 1 Pt. 1

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